Pears!

You will be forgiven for rolling your eyes at my excitement but you would understand if you knew that this pear tree has not grown one inch since I planted it three years ago and in fact, back in February, I was convinced the tree was dead. Well, it is not only alive, but it has produced it’s first batch of fruit. I hope that the fruit grows a little before we get any more hail storms; I don’t want these beauties getting knocked down.

I spy with my little eye...Pears!

PLUMBS!
Not to be outdone by the pear tree, the plum tree decided to fruit as well. Both the pear tree and the plum tree were planted at the same time. The plum tree however, has grown to three times its original size whereas the pear tree is almost the same height as when it was planted.

Whoop there it is!

The peach tree, the nectarine tree, and the grafted, multi-fruit (apricot, peach, nectarine, plum) tree are loaded with fruit but I could not get a decent picture to show you. I may get a better picture once the fruit is a little bigger.
This year I will bag the fruit. Bagging fruit is exactly that; putting bags around the fruit to prevent bugs from harming it. People who bag their fruit say that once you get some practice it doesn’t take as long as one may think. The fruit is not big enough for bags yet but in a couple of weeks it will be.

POTATOES

I finally added soil to the potato bags. The potatoes plants are growing very nicely and I again this year, I have not seen a single bug around them.

Yukon Gold, Purple Majesty, Kennebec

TOMATOES

Here is a shot of one of my Black Russian tomato plants. This one sits in a homemade sub-irrigated container. I have read on the Interwebs that there is another tomato called Russian Black that is not to be confused with this plant. It matters little to me since I ate this tomato last year and I thought I had tasted tomato Nirvana! Here’s to a bountiful harvest of this delicious fruit.

Come on Black Russian!

Here is a question for tomato fans; Is a ripe tomato a mature tomato? I ask this question because I saw a video on YouTube where a commercial tomato grower argues that a tomato DOES NOT ripen once you cut it from the plant. I went online and it seems everyone else thinks differently. Tomatoes are Climacteric fruit (like bananas and mangoes) meaning that they can continue to ripen once they have been harvested. But now I wonder if the guy in the video has a point. Watch it and form your own opinion.

Wait for it....wait for it....

LINK

Here is the link to a very interesting Power Point presentation about seeds. It gets technical quickly but the first few slides are very cool. I never knew there was a little plant inside the seed! http://oregonstate.edu/dept/biochem/hhmi/undergradresearch/2008/NguyenTheresa.ppt

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Posted in Spring. 5 Comments »

5 Responses to “Pears!”

  1. Gardener on Sherlock Street Says:

    I hope you have a “fruitful” harvest. It’s great that you have such variety.

  2. Rebecca M Says:

    Tomatoes are technically “mature” when they are still green. That means the seeds are fully developed. Theoretically, once they are “mature” they will “ripen” off the vine. By ripen, they mean turn red. I don’t care what the researchers say, but I have never yet had a tomato ripened off the vine that tastes as good as one ripened on the vine!

  3. inadvertentfarmer Says:

    Wow…everything looks great! I look to be a couple of weeks behind you.

    Why the tomatoes in the buckets? Love learning about new methods…Kim

    • yaquigrande Says:

      Thank you Inadvertentfarmer. I grow tomatoes in buckets because of the frequent hail storms and stem-breaking gale winds. When those hit, I am able to move at least a few plants to safety. Also, some of the buckets are sub-irrigated containers (a.k.a. self-watering containers) which make it so much easier to keep the plant watered during the hottest part of the Summer.
      Last, I can move the buckets as the garden evolves plus I can space them closer together. I still grow tomatoes in the ground though, as they grow bigger and produce more fruit than the ones in the buckets.


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